Haymaking

Haymaking

Fresh hay smells like hot summer days and sunscreen, sticky, sweet and fruity. If you look carefully at  each  tawny prickly brick you’ll spot the rough pale green baling twine that acts like a corset holding each bale in shape. These camouflaged parallel lines of order and control are wrapped round each bale by the rust coloured baler. In a whir of industry the machine sweeps up the loose hay from the neatly raked rows, compacted dry grass is spat out onto the stubbly paddock in rectangular parcels. The baling twine is the handle the haymakers use to lever their dirty gloved hands under so they can pick up each bale and swing it back and forth before letting momentum help it up onto the trailer. Continue reading “Haymaking”

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Switchbacks

Switchbacks

Smudges of khaki rainforest clot the swirling mist as we surge upwards and circle to the north. I’m without headphones so the burly medic sitting beside me shouts over the chopper noise asking whether we prefer Murchison or Nelson. The closest hospital is at Westport but there is no way the pilot can fly through the thick wall of cloud. I exchange a raised eyebrow with Sarah seated opposite. “Nelson is fine” I respond and settle back for my longest chopper ride ever. Continue reading “Switchbacks”

Getting a feel for the place

Getting a feel for the place

Finally the yo-yo slapping world of lift and drop ceases. A lifetime encapsulated in fifteen bone jolting minutes. We cautiously crab our way forward off the lurching boat onto the slippery but stationary rocks. There is no time to adjust we’re straight into parting tree branches, untangling vine traps and edging round thick nests of ferns. I’m grateful for Pavlo. Not only has he driven us from Christchurch, he’s figured out how to get across the wind swept fiord and as the non-Kiwi he is, as far as the clouds of ravenous sand-flies are concerned, tasty.  Continue reading “Getting a feel for the place”

Endurance

Endurance

The star-spangled curtain of black has a circular window glowing cold white. Dew is busy condensing to frost. We’re so busy talking we fail to take the Taihape turn off and realise only when the sign for Wanganui is silhouetted by our headlights. With renewed focus we feel our way north spurning the main road to Waioru in favour of darkness. My soda water bottle lying on the floor of the car acts as a spirit level rolling left and right as we wind our way between hills. Detaching from the hill cover where the Pukeokahu and Mangahoata roads meet Grethe steers us left towards the Pukeokahu school and our campsite. A home-made sign directs us to a paddock where a cluster of shadowy tents stand to attention flanked neatly by cars.  Viktor, our welcoming party of one, indicates the precise location of our respective tents. With the car engine extinguished the only sounds are Moreporks and the occasional bark of a dog.13007352_10206369099001755_7784460401348216047_n

Camp light. Photo by Jan Ducnuigeen

Continue reading “Endurance”

Melting Moments

Melting Moments

Conquering Everest

It was love at first light. The trail weaves a connecting path through many toanga – the Waitakeres, home to our fast disappearing coastal rainforest including beautiful groves of kauri, rata and pohutakawa. Wild, isolated, rugged coastlines with dramatic cliff faces and the towering walls of sand dunes (black) of Bethells that contrast with the wild surf pasted sand beaches (white) and dangerous rips of Piha. The primordial, green, scrawny spine of a peninsula that marks the way to Whatipu. My childhood hero and adult inspiration, the guy on our five dollar note, Ed. Continue reading “Melting Moments”