Eat Drink Run Repeat – A100 Race Report

Why?

Back in November 2014 I ran the Aorangi Undulator, a choice local event in the Aorangi Forest Park on the outskirts of Wellington.
http://aorangiundulator.org/A100.php
https://mustlovehills.com/2014/11/17/when-garage-projects-go-feral/

I enjoyed it so much I resolved to return in 2015 for the three-day version. The A100 is run by the same group of trail running enthusiasts who organise the Undulator. The 2014 attrition rate seemed high and the survivors appeared to pick up more than their fair share of injuries. The uncertain nature of the challenge appealed to my sense of adventure. I thought it would be a good test of my endurance and organisational skills and a great way to support an innovative local event while contributing to conservation in the Aorangi Forest Park. The fact that many of my fellow entrants were mates helped. I wouldn’t be doing a strange thing surrounded by strangers.

http://www.aorangitrust.org.nz/ Continue reading “Eat Drink Run Repeat – A100 Race Report”

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Reflections on the High Five-0 Challenge experience

Come 6am on Saturday 7 February I’ll be lining up at Rotorua’s Redwoods Visitor Centre with hundreds of other people hoping to complete the seventh annual Tarawera Ultra Marathon (TUM).

http://www.taraweraultra.co.nz/

The TUM is part of the Ultra-Trail World Tour which is a coup for TUM Founder Paul Charteris and his team, great publicity for the TUM and New Zealand trail running. Some of us will run 60, some 85km and barring fire, floods and tropical cyclones forcing a shortening of the course, some particularly hardy individuals will manage 100km. Some of us will not finish. About 30 of us will run with Mal Law up Rangitoto Peak along the way as part of Day 1 of the High Five-O Challenge. If you are part of the Tarawera phenomenon on 7 February you will see us running in our red shirts. Continue reading “Reflections on the High Five-0 Challenge experience”

When Garage Projects Go Feral

Trail running is enjoying a surge in popularity in New Zealand. This is a trend enterprising event organisers have been quick to capitalise on, effectively monetizing some of our most iconic trails. Scarcity value means some events sell out within minutes and relatively high entry fees can be charged as would-be participants compete just to gain access.

Continue reading “When Garage Projects Go Feral”